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Traditional sports

The nature of the activities depended on where the clan lived. For instance, those near a river or a lake included swimming in their daily activities, while those who lived near thickets or forests included trapping birds or small animals. Some activities were practiced in all parts of Luhyaland.
           
Wrestling (Amabwi): This was a very common sport. There were local rules for the game. For instance, in the Busia District, it was necessary for the winner to lay his opponent flat on the back before he could be acclaimed the winner. Throwing an opponent down flat on the stomach or in a sitting position or on his knees was not accepted. There were adjudicators to decide and to hear appeals. More...

African Hockey (Indolo or Obukhuyo): This was played with a specially carved stick, much like that used in the European game, at least in shape. The ball was either shaped out of a hard stump of wood, or simply a hard fruit; this latter only lasted for a game. More...

Bull Fights: This was a common sport in the Isukha, Idakho and Maragoli areas.  It has diminished somewhat in Maragoli but it’s still a large spectator sport in Idakho and Isukha. Because of its brutality it is attracting criticism from animal rights groups. More>>>

bullfighting
Bullfighting is a traditional spectator sport, still alive in Idakho & Isukha.

Swinging (Mwisubo, Namusuba or Mwirundo): A rope was tied between branches and young children would swing. More...

Gliding (Omuswelero): Performed on a slippery slope, or using banana trunks. (ix) Throwing the Hoop (Okhulasa Indika): Sticks were aimed through a moving hoop

Tug-O-War (Okhukhwesana Omukoye): A long thick rope was used; and each team consisted of nine people, though this varied depending on the number of people prepared to join, and on local practice. More...

Olukho: This was played on a board about three feet long which had two parallel rows of shallow holes on the top side. Each row had eight holes. On either end of the two rows was another, larger hole to be used as a ‘store’ for the pebbles or special round seeds about the size of a moth- ball, which were used for the game. More>>>

Night & sunset games

These were many and varied from place to place. Only the common are mentioned below. Though they were usually performed between supper and bedtime, some of them, especially those for the younger children could be and were performed during daylight.

Hide and Seek (Umbira Hena): The children carry one of their number who lies outstretched, facing down. His or her eyes are closed. The children move along singing. More...

Ting’i, Ting’i Teyo (or Denga Deyo): Two children join hands in an arch and the rest, joining hands, pass under the arch in a line singing.More

Oliliyo: The children make a circle holding hands and then walk round at a medium rhythmical pace while singing: More...

Wangwe Kolongolo: In this game the children stand in a line each holding the waist of the one before him. More...

Kitumbe ngololiro: The leader sings and moves round and round, while the rest Of the children, joining hands, follow him singing the Bukusu song, ‘Kitumbe Ngololilo’. More...

Ngalabayi: One child hides something (usually a hard red seed with a black spot called imbuulu) in one hand and closes both fists so swiftly that the onlooker can never be sure in which hand it is. More...

‘Linani’ (Maneater): One of the players places ‘torches’ (sticks or thick strings with fire at the end) on his ears, in the hands, between the toes, and at every convenient place of his body. More


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